72 firefighters tackle Rush Common flat fire

Written by on September 7, 2016 in Fire, News - 3 Comments

Investigators begin work

Investigations have already started

Investigations have already started

Seventy two firefighters and ten fire engines, as well as police and ambulance staff were called to a flat fire on Rush Common early this evening.

The fire badly damaged a second floor flat and the fire spread to the balconies of the floors above.

London Fire Brigade said: “When firefighters arrived the fire was fully developed and very visible. The initial fire crews worked incredibly hard to fight the fire quickly and limit the damage internally. Thankfully there are no reports of any injuries.”

The Brigade was called at 1831 and the fire was under control by 1936. Fire crews from Brixton, Lambeth and surrounding fire stations were at the scene. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Brixton Hill was closed with traffic diverted along Brixton Water Lane.

Police and fire service investigators are already working on what caused the blaze.

The St Matthew’s Estate social club provided tea and soft drinks for families who had been evacuated from their homes and the club acted as a communications hub for housing officers and firefighters. Hall staff stayed at the club until 1am with residents wanting to be rehoused.

One resident of Garland House told the Blog that the family who lived in the flat moved in about six months ago and that complaints about their behaviour had not led to action by the landlords, the Notting Hill Housing Trust.

Buses used Brixton Water Lane

Buses used Brixton Water Lane

 

Windows of a flat affected by the fire

Windows of a flat affected by the fire

 

Firefighters brought the fore under control, some using breathing apparatus

Firefighters brought the fire under control, some using breathing apparatus

 

Residents and passers-by watched from a safe distance

Residents and passers-by watched from a safe distance

 

St Matthews Estate social club

St Matthew’s Estate social club helped families who had been evacuated

 

Two mobile control centres were called

Two mobile control centres were called

 

Brixton Hill was closed

Brixton Hill was closed

About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. He works out of an office in St Matthews and before that the Bon Marché. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

3 Comments on "72 firefighters tackle Rush Common flat fire"

  1. yazmin September 9, 2016 at 9:58 am · Reply

    omg it was scary watching it happen

  2. Lisa dempster September 8, 2016 at 9:58 pm · Reply

    Really disappointed in Brixton blog thought it was true facts till I saw comment about st Matthews tenants hall life as normal, there were people that worked there making teas, coders and soft drinks for all the people and families that had been evacuated and list their homes helping and supporting these poor people as well as being the commucating place for the housing officers and firefighters who done such a wonderful job above their normal duties, also food was laid on by the hall so please don’t be like all other reporters and get things wrong , the hall staff stayed till 1am in morning with residents wanting to be rehoused

    • Alan Slingsby September 9, 2016 at 6:41 am · Reply

      Thanks Lisa. Have now corrected the story and caption.

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