Brixton barrows reborn

Written by on September 16, 2016 in Brixton Stories, Business, charity, Community, Local History, News - Comments Off on Brixton barrows reborn
Heritage of London Trust chair Dudley Fishburn and director Nicola Stacey cut the ceremonial ribbon

Heritage of London Trust chair Dudley Fishburn and director Nicola Stacey cut the ceremonial ribbon

Traders and supporters of Brixton Market gathered last night to celebrate the refurbishment of four of the market’s remaining traditional barrows.

Mari Reijnders who carried out the restoration the Brixton Station Road arch workshop with daughter Stella

Mari Reijnders who carried out the restoration in a Brixton Station Road arch workshop with daughter Stella

Only about half a dozen of what was once a fleet of 80 barrows remain, but they are being treated like the honoured veterans they are.

Cutting the ribbon were Heritage of London Trust chair Dudley Fishburn and director Nicola Stacey.

The completion of work on the barrows coincides with improvements to the Electric Avenue section of the market.

Next in line for restoration are some of the market’s traditional flat barrows.

An unrestored barrow was there to show what had been achieved

An unrestored barrow was there to show what had been achieved

 

Before and after wheels

Before and after wheels

 

Brixton Society chair Bill Linskey (left) with Market Traders' Federation CEO Stuart Horwood

Brixton Society chair Bill Linskey (left) with Market Traders’ Federation CEO Stuart Horwood

 

Market trader Ena's barrow was there

Market trader Ena’s barrow was there …

 

… so was Clive Bell's

… so was Clive Bell’s

 

Heritage of London trustee Ket Kemp, left, with chair Dudley Fishburn and director Nicola Stacey

Heritage of London trustee Kit Kemp, left, with chair Dudley Fishburn and director Nicola Stacey

 

Dudley Fishburn addresses supporters

Dudley Fishburn addresses supporters

School heritage project on display

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Lucy Lavers, Judy Ovens and Suzanna Prizeman (above) of Our Hut architecture education organised creative heritage workshops in two local schools – Hill Mead primary and Evelyn Grace Academy.

Instead of fruit and veg, some of the results from Hill Mead were on show on one of the restored barrows.

Hill Mead pupils' heritage work on one of the restored barrows

Hill Mead pupils’ heritage work on one of the restored barrows

The workshops were part of the Brixton Townscape Heritage Initiative, a Heritage Lottery funded project to preserve and enhance the unique architecture and historic character of Electric Avenue and to stimulate economic regeneration while raising knowledge and awareness of local heritage.

The first phase of workshops took place last term, before the regeneration, and there will be a second phase in summer 2018 after regeneration.

Phase 1 focused on helping the children to learn about and connect with their local area, particularly the market and heritage of Electric Avenue.

Workshops included a visit to the market, learning about Brixton’s past and thinking about improvements that could be made. Students produced creative responses to the architecture, history and daily life of the heart of Brixton.

Hill Mead streetscape

Two of the Hill Mead information boxes

Two of the Hill Mead information boxes

Children in Year 5 at Hill Mead Primary created information boxes on a wide variety of themes, and Year 7 at Evelyn Grace Academy produced a “street” of themed boards.

A schools resource will be available for other local schools to use.

 

About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

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