Lambeth Heritage Festival returns for a third year

Written by on August 5, 2015 in Culture, Local History - Comments Off on Lambeth Heritage Festival returns for a third year

Local people, past and present, will be celebrated with a varied month-long programme of activities in and around Brixton this September, as the Lambeth Heritage Festival returns for its third year. 

Programmes are now available to pick up in all Lambeth Libraries and at the Town Hall or you can download yours online. Here’s our round up of the Brixton highlights this year.

The archive today, courtesy of London Borough of Lambeth, Archives Department

The archive today, courtesy of London Borough of Lambeth, Archives Department

1. Lambeth Archives Open Day
Saturday 26 September, 10am-5pm, Lambeth Archives

Free to attend. 

With Minet Library facing an uncertain future, there’s no better time to nip down to Knatchbull Road and appreciate all that this fantastic local resource can offer the community. Throughout the day they’ll be a selection of talks on local history including one by Hannah Walker, the Editor in Chief at South London Press, talking about 150 years of writing local news. They’ll be an exhibition of Lambeth Archives materials chosen by the staff, a book sale and a film screening too.

2. Lambeth’s Golden Jubilee Walk
Friday 11 September, 2pm, Meet at Lambeth Town Hall

Free to attend. Booking essential.

Local historian, Len Reilly will be leading a guided walk marking fifty years of Lambeth as a borough. The walk will explore the key sites of Lambeth’s municipal past.

3. 40 years on – the history of the Brixton Society
Thursday 10 September, 7-9pm, Vida Walsh Centre 

Free to attend. Light refreshments provided.

An evening celebrating our much-loved historical society, without whom Brixton Blog would not have had half the facts available for projects like our Brixton Buildings series. The evening will include an illustrated talk on the history of the society.

Somerleyton Road, c. 1965

Somerleyton Road, c. 1965

4. Ted Hollamby and the architecture of post-war Lambeth: walk
Saturday 5 September, 2.30pm, meet at BCA

Free to attend. Booking essential.

Coinciding with the publication of a new book by Edmund Bird and Fiona Price, Lambeth Architecture 1965-99, Ian McInnes of the C20 Society will lead this walk looking at the social housing which has shaped Brixton, The walk is good exercise too at 3 miles long and finishes up at Herne Hill Station.

5. Remembering Somerleyton Road and Geneva Road
Thursday 24 September, 6pm, BCA

Suggested donation of £5 for this event. Booking via Eventbrite is essential. 

Join Kelly Foster, Donald Hinds and George Fowokan Kelly as they remember the buildings and communities of two streets at the centre of the Carribean community in Brixton.

Read our interview with Kelly Foster, talking about Brixton’s heritage here.

barber-crop

Francis Barber

6. Black Georgians in London – Friends of Francis Barber: talk
Thursday 17 September, 1pm, Black Cultural Archives

Free to attend. 

Jamaican manservent Francis Barber lived in London from 1952 and served Dr Samuel Johnson until his death. Celine Luppo McDaid will draw upon materials from the BCA to discuss the friendship between the two men, which resulted in Johnson leaving his estate to Francis.

Further afield …

And if you’re happy to venture a little further afield there’s a talk about ‘The River Effra’s vanishing act’ at West Norwood’s Portico gallery (Friday 4 September, 7pm); an evening of Portuguese wine and music at Tate South London Library (Wednesday 23 September, 7pm) and a workshop on the changing face of local news in the area at Streatham Library, led by the Assistant Editor of the South London Press (Tuesday 15 September, 6.30pm) – definitely one for us keen bloggers!

About the Author

A lover of high art, low art and everything in between, Ruth loves an excuse to meet artists and unravel the stories of Brixton today. Ruth specialises in interviewing artists, makers, comedians and performers for the Blog and the Bugle, as well as profiling our architecture, pubs and places of historical significance.

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