Brixton’s giant twin eggs going down well

Written by on August 10, 2016 in Art, Community, Council, Culture, News - No comments
Twins, by Taslima Martin outside Southwyck House

Twins, by Taslim Martin, outside Southwyck House

The new large sculptures on the corner of Somerleyton Road and Coldharbour Lane on the grassy area outside Southwyck House (the Barrier Block) seem to be going down well with local people.

“They are huge, they are beautiful and the most exciting part is they make the area there seem more welcoming. There has already been an increased number of people enjoying the green space in the sunshine there,” said Sophie Lynas (who also supplied our picture).

“As a resident of Southwyck House, I’m excited to see the space being used in a positive way and am delighted we have been chosen as a spot for public art – what a privilege to be able to enjoy these sculptures every day. Thank you to whoever put them there!”

Cllr Jack Hopkins, Lambeth council cabinet member for culture, explained: “Twins by the artist Taslim Martin was created with input from Coldharbour Lane and Somerleyton Road residents and the wider local community.

“I’m delighted they are now in place and already provoking a good response from local people.”

The work takes the form of two large egg-shaped sculptures that are identical in shape, but different in appearance, having been cast using the same mould but in different metals.

One has a polished metal finish that reflects the sky and the surrounding buildings, the other has a non-reflective rich orange brown oxidised iron finish. The polished metal sculpture has symbols, patterns and designs etched into its surface.

The artwork has been funded through a “section 106 obligation” (A legal agreement between a local authority and a developer linked to planning permission) with additional funding for the community engagement element coming from the government’s Working Neighbourhoods Fund.

Signage to explain the artwork is due to follow.

About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. He works out of an office in St Matthews and before that the Bon Marché. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

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