Sargent: The Watercolours

Written by on May 7, 2017 in - No comments
When:
June 21, 2017 – October 8, 2017 all-day
2017-06-21T00:00:00+01:00
2017-10-09T00:00:00+01:00
Cost:
£15.50

 

John Singer Sargent, Blind Musicians, 1912, watercolour on paper, on preliminary pencil, 39.4 x 53 cm, Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums Collections. Purchased in 1927, half the auction price met by Sir James Murray

Blind Musicians, 1912, watercolour on paper, on preliminary pencil, 39.4 x 53 cm, Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums Collections. Purchased in 1927, half the auction price met by Sir James Murray

Dulwich Picture Gallery presents Sargent: The Watercolours from 21 June to 8 October, the first major UK exhibition of watercolours by the Anglo-American artist, John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), since 1918.

The exhibition assembles 80 works from arguably Sargent’s greatest period of watercolour production between 1900 and 1918.

Renowned as the leading portraitist of his generation, Sargent mastered the medium of watercolour during painting expeditions to southern Europe and the Middle East, where he developed a distinctive way of seeing and composing. Often dismissed as travel souvenirs, they were an integral part of Sargent’s artistic production.

The exhibition will showcase Sargent’s landscapes, architectural structures and figurative scenes and highlight the most radical aspects of his work, in particular the close-up, his unusual use of perspective and the arresting and dynamic poses of his figures.

After the turn of the twentieth-century, Sargent painted more landscapes than any other subject. His scenes are often unconventional, opting for closely cropped details rather than full, panoramic views.

He focused on form and surface pattern, particularly in his mountain landscapes such as Bed of a Torrent, where he transforms mossy rocks and flowing brooks into a complex arrangement, rejecting distance and scale.

Similar to photographic snapshots, his landscapes, with their informal compositions and abrupt cropping, capture a moment in time.

Loans will come from UK institutions including Tate, The British Museum, The Fitzwilliam, The Imperial War Museum and The Ashmolean, alongside works rarely seen from numerous private collections. Key loans will also come from European institutions; Museu de Montserrat, Abadia de Montserrat, Barcelona; the Museu Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon and the Petit Palais, Musee de Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris.

Dulwich Picture Gallery is celebrating 200 years since it first opened its doors to the public in 1817. In June it will open the first Dulwich Pavilion in partnership with the London Festival of Architecture and has a special programme of events and displays throughout the year.

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