Let’s dance …

Written by on September 25, 2015 in Art, Community, Culture, News - Comments Off on Let’s dance …
Street theatre in Brixton

OurBrixton street theatre earlier this year

OurBrixton logo

OurBrixton, the multi-arts campaign that discusses and responds to Brixton’s fast-changing identity, is organising a “secret and fun” direct action event on Sunday 27 September.
Anyone wanting to take part should meet up at Brixton Tube – with their dancing shoes – at 12.30 pm. The secret location will be in walking distance.
OurBrixton launched in April this year to discuss and respond to “hyper-gentrification” of Brixton.”For the past six months we have fought on the front line of the gentrification war in London,” said a spokesperson, “demonstrating, occupying spaces, supporting eviction resistance and generally raising awareness of local campaigns”.
But while housing has been to the fore in its efforts, OurBrixton wants to highlight the local venues, arts spaces and community spaces “that have been under heavy attack and are now in huge decline”.
The list of victims includes
Kaff Bar
Mango Landin’
Canterbury Arms
Mass
Brady’s
Fridge Bar (Served with a CPO)
Music Bar/ George IV (Turned into a Tesco despite being listed as an “asset of community value” having been functioning since 1864)
Club 414 (facing eviction)
Harmony
The Angel
The Grosvenor
Rest In Noise
The Telegraph
The Junction
Substation South
Loughborough Hotel.
“These were not simply venues and pubs. They were part of our culture, heritage; and they were community spaces,” said the campaign.
It said Lambeth council had made “devastating cuts to local arts services and charities like Raw Material, who work tirelessly to provide arts training and opportunities for our young and vulnerable people.
“Incredibly, it would also appear that Lambeth does not even have an arts and culture policy.
“Community spaces and access to the arts are key ingredients for both the well being of individuals and social welfare. For these reasons, we will begin to take Direct Action to highlight these concerns, and start reclaiming our spaces.
“This is Our Brixton. See you there!”

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About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

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