New menu at Black Cultural Archives

Written by on September 10, 2015 in Food, News, What's On - Comments Off on New menu at Black Cultural Archives
Groundnut_work

Members of the Groundnut Collective at work

Brixton’s Black Cultural Archives café will launch a new African-inspired menu on Wednesday September 23.Black Cultural Archives logo

The BCA says its café will be transformed into “a warm and authentic hub celebrating African-inspired dishes and refreshments that playfully bring together flavours and tastes from across the community”.

The menu will be devised by the south London based Groundnut collective and include recipes taken from their recently published book, The Groundnut Cookbook.

The changing menu will be freshly prepared and each week champion something different from – classic traditional dishes to the newly adapted combinations.

Sample dishes will include hot plates such as green soup – a blend of callaloo, spinach and okra with a dash of Moringa – and roti canai wraps – layered flatbread with a meat and sweet potato filling. They will be complemented by refreshments like Supermalt, Jamaican sorrel tea, fresh coconut water, squeezed juices and freshly pressed Ethiopian coffee and Kenyan teas.

The menu launch is on Wednesday September 16 from 6.00 to 9.00pm and will includes taster, music and late opening of the current display Voices of 1981, which delves into the archive collection to revisit this pivotal year in British – and Brixton – history.

The menu will be available on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10am to 5.30pm. The BCA café is also open Tuesdays and Wednesdays serving teas, coffees and a selection of cakes.

Groundnut_book_250The  Groundnut collective is Duval Timothy, Jacob Fodio Todd and Folayemi Brown.

The Groundnut Cookbook is available in the BCA Shop for £20.00.

www.thegroundnut.co.uk

@thegroundnut

www.bcaheritage.org.uk

@bcaheritage

 

Black Cultural Archives opening times: Tuesday to Saturday, 10am to 6pm. General admission is free.

About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

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