Photography pub quiz at the Ritzy

Written by on February 7, 2017 in charity, News, What's On - Comments Off on Photography pub quiz at the Ritzy

Camera lensBrixton-based charity PhotoVoice is hosting its first photography pub quiz at the Ritzy tonight (7 February).

It will be part of an evening celebrating everything photographic. All money raised will help PhotoVoice achieve its vision of “a world where everybody has the opportunity to represent themselves” by putting cameras into the hands of underrepresented communities.

Teams will get an opportunity to network with quiz hosts who are industry professionals, including Wall Street Journal photo editor, Dan Gaba.

The quiz will cover everything from famous faces to the history of photography and include some general knowledge and non-photographic questions.

Doors 7pm; bar until 11pm; quiz 8pm – 10pm. £8 per person.

 


 

PhotoVoice runs photography workshops for underrepresented communities, so that people can share their perspectives and tell their own stories.

It says mainstream media often reports for their own gain and leave out the personal experiences of those affected.

“The camera is a powerful tool when placed in the hands of local people.” It says.

PhotoVoice’s award-winning projects have addressed issues like climate change, trafficking, conflict, HIV and disability.

PhotoVoice aims to use the power of photography to communicate complex ideas, stories and perspectives quickly and directly – making it an accessible tool that can break down language and social barriers.

Sharing photography can be cheap and effortless, increasing the potential to generate dialogue and allowing those at the forefront of an issue to represent themselves and to challenge misconceptions.

Find out more.

“Women have a very strong role in climate change preparation and response. They undertake many important tasks such as collecting and storing resources to create food banks for livestock for hard times, and water fetching during drought. It should be recognised that women are as equally important as men in development. Formally we were not permitted to attend community meetings and were not represented in community committees. Now this has changed and we are actively involved in decision making and contribute to building coping strategies for the whole community. We are equally as important.”

© Kula Taro Wariyo, Ethiopia , 2015. PhotoVoice/Christian Aid/BRACED (Building Resilience and Adaption to Climate Extremes and Disasters).

About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

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