Still time to act for Arches traders

Arches_750_DSC_7133If you are not already one of the 140-plus people who have objected to Network Rail’s plans for Brixton Arches, you still have until Thursday (10 March) to make your voice heard on the future of Brixton.

And the good news is that the Brixton Society has now weighed in with expert advice on exactly how to make your views count.

The society suggests that your objection should be along the following lines:


I object to this planning application in light of the following policies from the Lambeth Local Plan:

PN3: Limiting the proportion of restaurant/ bar/ takeaway uses (A3/A4/A5 use classes) in major centres. At least 60% of the units should remain mainstream retail (class A1) and Network Rail’s proposals disrupt this balance;

ED6: Seeking to retain smaller shop units and at affordable rents – Network Rail’s proposals do not meet this policy.


Your personal opinions are, of course, also welcomed by the Arches traders who are fighting to save their own livelihoods and to preserve the Brixton that so many people love and that attracts thousands of people from all over the world to visit it.

But keep it civil, please. Abusive objections can be ignored.

If you have any doubts about why this is important, read trader Riccardo Festa’s personal view. Or see what Ray Murphy of Budget Carpets and Malek Menad of Denmay Fabrics think about how they and other traders have been treated,

You can make your voice count by objecting online here.

About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. He works out of an office in St Matthews and before that the Bon Marché. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

5 Comments on "Still time to act for Arches traders"

  1. B March 9, 2016 at 1:22 pm ·

    The link is not working.

  2. Louise Etheridge March 8, 2016 at 10:27 am ·

    I have been coming to Brixton for years. It is the market that makes Brixton’s atmosphere. To destroy the arches would be to destroy the very essence of Brixton and why people visit. Making rents so that only corporates can afford them will be very damaging to the area.

  3. Ric March 7, 2016 at 11:11 pm ·

    Change is good, but not at the expense of people’s businesses and livelihoods.

  4. Dil Green March 7, 2016 at 8:20 pm ·

    I would also point out that the proposals go against three of the six major strategic aims of the Local Plan, without positively addressing either of the other three:
    Specifically, it goes against B, E and F, while doing nothing for A, C or D. Thus there can be no argument that breaching some specific policies is justifiable on wider grounds.

    A Accommodating population growth
    B Achieving economic prosperity and opportunity for all
    C Tackling and adapting to climate change
    D Providing essential infrastructure
    E Promoting community cohesion and safe, liveable neighbourhoods
    F Creating and maintaining attractive, distinctive places

  5. shemi March 7, 2016 at 8:02 pm ·

    Yet again, a community is under siege form what appears to be a determined ploy to irreversibly change the demographic and social -economic make up of what is one of the most diverse and buoyant corners of europe.
    By a bland, soulless and elitist and greedy commercialization of a cohesive community.
    This has both classicist and racial undertones. And the community has stuck together.

    Network rail takes the cue, from an immoral labour cabinet who mentally sectioned an 81 yr old man to evict him form his clapham home. He is now in Kings hospital.(as the weekend of writing). A labour cabinet whose actions/decision on cressingham gardens demolitions among toher six estates has been deemed unlawful by the highcourt in london.
    Change has to work for everyone not a few.

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