Volunteers raise £8,000 for disabled cycling

Written by on September 30, 2015 in charity, Community, News - Comments Off on Volunteers raise £8,000 for disabled cycling

Whoosh cycling event

Brixton-based charity Wheels for Wellbeing hosted a special Thank You event last weekend to honour Herne Hill Whoosh who have raised over £8,000 to help more people with disabilities benefit from cycling.
Whoosh are a charitably driven group of cyclists, friends and families who embark on one cycle challenge each year to raise money for one local, and one international charity.
This year the local charity was Wheels for Wellbeing, who gratefully received the proceeds of sponsorship and fundraising generated by a five-day cycle of over 300 miles from Fishguard in south west Wales to the Lincolnshire coast.
The event at the Herne Hill velodrome showed the “Whooshers” just what their support means and how the fantastic amount of funds raised will be used. Whooshers and their families took to the charity’s fleet of tricycles, handcycles, side-by-side tandems and more, to learn how Wheels for Wellbeing helps those that would not normally have the opportunity to cycle.
Wheels for Wellbeing director Isabelle Clement said: “The amazing £8,000 that they raised will enable disabled people to come and cycle 800 times with us – many will be completely new to cycling, as they never thought it was possible due to their disability, or have not cycled since acquiring disability or becomin older age.
“Everyone should get to experience the wonderful feeling of the wind in their hair and fantastic voluntary donations like this help make it a reality.”

About the Author

Alan Slingsby moved to Brixton just as the 1981 uprising began. His nearest pub was the Effra and nearest off licence the Frontline — long gone in an earlier wave of closures of treasured community establishments. He works out of an office in St Matthews and before that the Bon Marché. Has edited newspapers for the National Union of Students and National Union of Teachers. Now makes a living designing magazines and books and anything else people will pay him for.

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